Good News: Print and Mail are Alive and Well

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By Nancy DeDiemar, president, Printing Resources of Southern California
It is about time that quick printers got some good news, and here it is:
Print and mail are alive and well!
Contrary to conventional wisdom among customers and even some printers that direct mail is “junk” mail, or “old” technology, or incompatible with environmental stewardship, print and mail remain an important part of any effective marketing program.
In 2009, Target Analytics published the Index of National Fundraising Performance, which analyzed giving via direct mail marketing for 79 of the largest nonprofit organizations in the United States. The study included data from more than 38 million donors, and more than 74 million gifts totaling in excess of $2 billion in revenue.
Study results show that direct mail was responsible for 78 percent of donations received, or about $8 of every $10 contributed. This made direct mail the top source of fundraising–ahead of the Internet (9 percent) or telemarketing (3 percent). The study also found that Internet-based giving is increasing (from 4 percent in 2005), and that Internet gifts tend to be larger than those received as the result of direct mail ($79 versus $45).
One particularly interesting finding is that in 2009, 89 percent of all new donors to the nonprofits in the study were acquired via direct mail, while only 12 percent were acquired online.
Local Targeted Marketing
Knowing the national trends in direct mail marketing will help keep you from having to agree with your customers who insist that email marketing is superior to traditional direct mail. Trends may be pointing in that direction, but as shown by numerous studies, today direct mail still dominates results.
This is even more apparent when thinking about marketing locally. An obvious example of successful local marketing using direct mail is a political campaign for mayor, city council, school district, a local bond issue or proposition, etc. For local campaigns, direct mail remains the most effective way to introduce a candidate or an issue, largely because the marketing can target specific blocs of voters.
Likewise, direct mail remains an effective and economical way to reach a small geographic division such as a neighborhood. Many mail list providers now offer online tools to pinpoint a small area such as a one mile radius around a restaurant, or offer list enhancement services (adding demographic information such as household income, gender, race) to enable even better targeting of the audience. 
In fact, the ability to target a specific audience remains a primary strength of direct mail versus other communication channels, including email. Businesses that collect additional information about their customers can develop very personal campaigns based on using variable data printing. Or, the direct mail piece can act as an introduction to Web-based marketing by presenting a PURL (personalized URL) as the call-to-action.
Comparing Direct Mail to Email
Cost alone is not a sufficient measure to compare direct mail to email, because using email introduces other factors that do not apply to direct mail.
For example: With email, the sender has incomplete control over how the message appears to the recipient, both when it is received in preview, and after it is opened. A printed piece does not change based on the type of reader the recipient is using.
Email depends on a variety of Internet service providers (ISPs) to deliver the message, each with its own blocks and filters for email. The USPS® delivers all the mail unless the address is faulty. There are also tools such as National Change of Address (NCOALink®) processing, and delivery point validation (DPV®) to identify undeliverable addresses during mail list processing.
A sender of email risks having his Internet Protocol (IP) address being blacklisted by ISPs. While blacklisting is a useful tool to cut down on spam, the decision on whether a message should be blacklisted rests with the ISP, not with the message recipient. With traditional direct mail, the recipient decides whether to put himself on the “Do Not Mail” list.
When talking about costs, discourage customers from only considering the cost of distribution (i.e.: printing + mailing + postage costs) when comparing direct mail to email. A better comparison is the cost-per-response for direct mail and email–although, as yet, there is insufficient data on email response rates.
The Final Word: Walk the Talk
Printers and mailers can make a strong case for traditional direct mail as part of a marketing campaign, but only if they walk the talk. A printer who relies solely on email to stay in touch with customers and prospects or, worse yet, uses no form of outreach at all, has a serious credibility problem.
This is what it takes to conduct a traditional direct mail marketing campaign:
Get a mail list. Include your Top 100 customers, the prospects for whom you issued a quote for significant work, and all the businesses within a 10-15 mile radius of your printing company that you think you should be doing business with you, or who buy a significant amount of the type of printing you do best.
Design a mail piece. Postcards are a good choice, so is a monthly newsletter. Subscribe to a newsletter service such as Printips and you’ll have content to use for the newsletter, a postcard, and email.
Write up a work order. Viewed in the context of walking the talk, your direct mail piece is as important as any work you are being paid to produce. Get it on the production schedule and complete it on time.
Partner with a lettershop or mail at the single-piece First-Class™ postage rate.
If you don’t have the skills and equipment to do the mailing yourself, find a lettershop you can subcontract to. Walking the talk is more important than saving money on postage. 
Keep it up. Don’t stop. Augment traditional direct mail with email if you like, but don’t ever stop using direct mail. Your shop’s future depends on it!

—Source: Nancy DeDiemar is the president of Printing Resources of Southern California, a quick print shop in Upland, CA, offering printing, copying, electronic prepress, and mailing services. Nancy is the co-publisher of Printips (www.printips.com), a newsletter subscription service for printers. Contact her at Nancy@printingresources.com. 

Make Your Direct Mail Flow From Outside to Inside

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By Andrea Ratajczak, seasoned marketing consultant & co-founder of PDA Marketing
If you want your direct mail piece to be one of the 66 percent that gets opened and read, rather than the 34 percent that gets thrown away unopened, you’ll have to design a compelling outer envelope among many other things. It is hard to say; however, how much of the 66 percent just gets opened and thrown away with no response from the recipient.
One of the most important parts of a direct mail envelope and letter set is that everything on the piece flows. If the outside of your envelope is compelling enough for the person to open it, you don’t want to disappoint them with a boring, white letter on the inside, as this will lose their attention immediately. Here are some tips to making everything, and I mean everything, in your direct mail flow:
1) Design your own stamp
While this may still be on the outside of the envelope, it is a special touch you can give the letter, or even postcard, to attract a potential customer’s attention. It will showcase your creativity and attention to detail, as most people aren’t even aware that designing your own postage stamp is a possibility!
Using a live stamp in itself can greatly increase the percentage of opened letters, but having a personalized stamp says so much more. There are certain USPS® approved design studios that can help you design your own stamp that you can then purchase for a little more than a regular stamp.
2) Match the concepts on the envelope and inner letter
Make sure that you use both the inside and outside of the envelope to sell, and make both compelling. (WARNING…if you make false or irrelevant statements to get the recipient to go inside the envelope you lose all credibility and drive the prospect further away. Consequently, you’ll never make a sale.)
Be honest from the beginning. Make sure you follow through on the inside with whatever you said on the outside.
3) Graphics match outside and inside
Continuity is the key. The words need to match, and so do the graphics. There is nothing more disconcerting than a complete break between the envelope that first attracted you and the letter you see when you rip it open. Once again, you lose your audience in confusion, rather then reel them in.
Several products can help you put together a super mailer. You can purchase little graphics like hand-drawn doodles (the product named Doodleopes is an example) to go on the outside of the envelope to draw people in, and identical- looking doodles to go on the inside. Not only do these help your direct mail flow, but they attract attention to the correct parts of the sales letter, and make your company seem unique and creative!
4) Name/logo reflective of product
This may seem obvious, but the same product name and logo need to go on every part of your direct mail; from the envelope, to the letter inside, to any postcard you may send. Nothing will make you look more untrustworthy than a weird, disconnected name and logo.
In fact, making your product’s name and logo reflective of the actual product is not just a direct mail campaign worry. It’s important the name and logo match to increase sales and ensure that the customer knows what they’re buying. A confused customer will lead to the direct mail being thrown straight in the garbage can.
—Source: Presort.com May 18, 2010 (www.presort.com). Andrea Ratajczak is a seasoned marketing consultant and co-founder of PDA Marketing, an authorized USPS design studio. Visit http://pdamarketing.net/store_stamp.html to have PDA design your next stamp.
 

4 Tips to Save Money on Printing

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By Nani Paape, independent project facilitator

Money Saving Tip #1: Choose an efficient flat size
With paper costs accounting for 25 percent or more of a print job’s cost, it pays to be smart about paper.

You will always get a better deal on printing when your piece fits on the printing paper with little off-cut, the part of the sheet trimmed away and tossed directly into the recycling bin.

Right relationship of press sheet size to flat size
The size of paper a printer runs through his press depends on the press size and other factors. Here are some of the common sizes:

  • 17 x 22 inches
  • 19 x 25 inches
  • 20 x 26 inches
  • 23 x 35 inches
  • 25 x 38 inches
  • 28 x 34 inches
  • 26 x 40 inches

When you consider format sizes to fit these press sheets, think in terms of the flat size, the dimensions of the entire unfolded piece.

Regardless of the press sheet size to be used, keep in mind that your design can’t fill every square inch of it. Room must be left for grip, the edge of the sheet that the equipment grabs to pull it through the press. Room must be left for color bars, too.

If your design has solid ink areas running right up to the edge, the printer will also need at least 1/8-inch of extra room around each page to accommodate these bleeds.

Infamous and Famous Flat Sizes

Legal size (8-1/2 x 14 inches) is infamously wasteful. That’s because it leaves behind a lot of waste when the unused paper is off-cut from common-sized press sheets. See the diagram below. It’s not to scale, but it illustrates my point.

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As the second diagram illustrates, 6 x 9- inch pages (a 12 x 9-inch flat size) fit very well, leaving very little waste on the press sheet.

This layout is a money-saver for small, 16-page, self-cover booklets printed on a 28-inch press.

Similarly, eight, 8 x 10-inch pages (a 10 x 16-inch flat size) fit very efficiently on the size of press sheet used on a 40-inch press.

This efficient format for a 16-page, self-cover book will yield savings, especially when compared to an oddly sized one.

Disaster Avoidance Tip
Once you have a specific design format or size in mind, show a quick sketch or PDF to the printer you’re thinking of using.

If you follow his or her suggestions and adjust one or both page dimensions–sometimes by as little as half an inch–you are likely to enjoy significant savings.

Money Saving Tip #2: Ask the paper mill for a discount
To calculate paper costs for a print job, a print estimator either looks up the book price or calls their paper merchant to get deviated or discounted pricing. 
Book prices are the standard, published prices a paper merchant has set for the papers they carry.

Talk with the paper mill rep
There’s another way to get deviated paper pricing: If you have a specific paper stock in mind for a large project, take the time to get in touch with that paper company’s mill rep. For example, if you specified Environment, you would contact a Neenah Paper mill rep.

If your print project involves a large paper purchase, the mill rep may offer you a promotional price deviation. Why is this? Like every other business, paper mills really want your business. I don’t advise asking mill reps for paper deals on every little print job, but if you’re printing 10,000, 48-page booklets, the mill may be quite willing to sweeten the deal to win your order.

Refer to the mill’s Web site, or call a paper merchant (such as Unisource or West Coast Paper) for the regional mill rep’s contact information.

Disaster Avoidance Tips
At the time that you request print estimates, be sure to alert the bidding printers that the mill has offered a price deviation, and ask them to instruct their paper merchant to contact the mill for the special pricing.
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If a printer skips this step, you will not get the paper discount the mill rep offered you. Also, if one bidding printer’s prices reflect the discount, but another’s do not, you won’t be comparing apples to apples, and may not get the lowest possible price.

Some printers buy a big volume of paper from one merchant, so they also get a volume discount from that merchant. A paper mill’s promotional price deviation may or may not be a better deal than your printer’s volume discount, but it’s definitely worth asking!

Money Saving Tip #3: Ask for series pricing
Customers who share with their printer their plans to print a project again within a few months’ time usually save money on that entire printing series.

Why? Because every company appreciates repeat business, and printers are no exception. Most businesses know that it costs less to retain an existing customer than to land a new one.

So, for example, if you print 10,000 magazines each quarter in 2010, and award the printing for the entire series to one printer, that printer is likely to give you a great price.

Disaster Avoidance Tips

  • You may be tempted to have your printer purchase all of the paper for the entire series at once to save more money. However, this is not always wise, given how quickly a company’s quantity needs can change. Once you buy that paper, you own it, whether you use it or not. Owning cartons of unused paper is a big pain! (Where will you store it? Under your bed?)
  • Re-bid your print series once a year. Getting bids from more than one printer will give you a negotiating advantage, even if you hope to stick with the same printer.
  • Ask the printer to alert you when a paper price increase is on the horizon, so that you can lock in the lower paper price for the next issue.
  • Remember, the most expensive jobs are one-off, hair-on-fire ones, handed to the printer at the last minute. This is especially true for printing that needs to be completed in three days flat. It never fails that these are the jobs that contain errors that require a re-do scramble for which you have allowed no time!

Planning ahead saves both money and aggravation, while increasing the odds that your printed products will be error-free.

Money Saving Tip #4: Be buttoned up
Back in my ad agency days, one of the highest compliments you could pay someone was to call them buttoned up. Buttoned-up people are organized. Together. On top of things. No missed details. No “oops!” moments.

You will save money on printing by being buttoned up–both when you place your printing order and at every stage of the print production cycle.

Buttoned-up jobs go more smoothly than disorganized, scattered ones. And printers like jobs to go smoothly just as much as you do!

Button up your print job with these Disaster Avoidance Tips

When you release the job:

  • Review your initial written specifications and bring them up-to-date. Be sure the quantity has been confirmed.
  • Supply these specs to the printer along with the job. No, everything the printer needs is NOT “in the file!” Include the shipping information, too. Few people do this, but it eliminates last-minute panic calls: “Hey, we are ready to ship your order today, where are these going?”
  • Spell check one last time, after those last, tiny text edits are made. That’s when errors tend to sneak by everyone.
  • Release clean and complete files to up the chances that your job will proof without a hitch: Remove unused fonts and colors. Re-check your measurements. Be sure colors and special effects have been applied consistently throughout the document. Include all links and be sure that they are up-to-date.
  • If you’ve manipulated any images significantly, be sure to supply th
    e camera raw or original PSD files. That way, they will be close at hand if needed. (Some designers manipulate their files right out of sufficient data without realizing it–until they see a disappointing proof).
  • Supply a folding dummy that shows exactly how you want the final to look when it’s trimmed and finished. Many a revise will be avoided with this step.

When you review proofs and press check:

  • Allow sufficient time to review color image proofs thoroughly without rushing. If you spot every change you want to make during your first viewing, you’ll save money. Whenever possible, discuss image proofs with your rep as you mark them up, so he or she will be able to interpret your wishes to the prepress operator back at the shop.
  • When reviewing composed proofs and bluelines, again, do not rush. Be sure that everyone who needs to approve them sees the proofs and signs off on them before they go back to the printer. I can guarantee that the one person you leave out of the routing will be the one who insists on a crucial last-minute change–the kind that costs money.
  • Show up for press checks on time. Then once you’re press-side, review everything carefully, but don’t dally indecisively. Time really is money.
  • Approve a printed, finished sample before your client sees it.

If you do all of these things, chances are good that your clients will receive their printed products on time and as expected. They may even say, “Boy, you are so buttoned up!”

And here’s the bonus: The next time you ask that same printer for a bid, he is likely to recall that working with you was painless–and give you a price without (as one friend calls it) the pain-and-boredom surcharge.

—Source: Nani Paape is an independent project facilitator who provides print production management, marketing writing, and creative project planning to design firms and creative companies. Read more about Nani’s print management philosophy on her blog, Printing Disasters–and How to Avoid Them, at NaniPrints.wordpress.com. © 2010

Print Planning at the Arm-Waving Stage

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By Nani Paape, independent project facilitator 
I like to get in the loop with a print project while it’s still at the arm-waving stage. That’s the time when designers are just beginning to dream up design solutions, but haven’t done too much designing. Sometimes the entire design team gets together at this point; other times it’s just me and the lead designer. It’s a great time to include the electronic production artist, too. Don’t forget to bring the creative brief!
At an arm-waving stage meeting, designers ask me questions like:
• “Have you ever seen…” or 
• “Is it possible to print silver ink on top of 4-color images?” or 
• “Can you find me some printed samples of black and metallic copper Duotones?” or
• “How many pages does a book need to have in order to be perfect-bound?”
I review the creative brief and ask questions to help me understand the designer’s creative intent, too. With this understanding, I can often suggest techniques and structures and start thinking about workarounds for must-have design features that may pose manufacturing challenges.

Things print managers think about
Are there finishing or mailing considerations? Does the piece need to fit into a particular size of envelope or weigh in under an ounce? Will the reader want to write on the paper? Where will the pieces be shipped to and when do they need to arrive? Will posters be folded or rolled?
All of these questions need to be considered during design, but can be easily missed. Asking them before design begins, helps avoid future revisions.

Pesky budget details that influence design direction
At this meeting it’s good to review any budget information that’s available. We might want to sketch out rough specifications for pre-design, budget estimates.
We can also discuss which ideas would be likely to fall into VW, Ford, or Rolls Royce price ranges. For example, a plus-cover brochure on premium uncoated paper will be more expensive than a self-cover brochure on a number 2 coated paper. A design that includes 20 photos will cost more than one that includes 10.
When the preliminary estimates come in, you’ll know whether an approach you’re considering will fit the budget the client has in mind before you’ve spent time and energy going down that design path. 
Some designers worry that a production manager will be a naysayer or budget gatekeeper. I don’t operate that way. I rarely advise designers to kill any idea at the arm-waving stage. After all, finding ways to produce cool designs within budget is a big part of the fun!
Early is good
I usually leave these sessions with a list of samples to track down, technical questions to research, and budget bids to send out. 
Including print and production resources at the arm-waving stage gets everyone thinking about the project and beginning to draw up our internal checklists and ideas, as they relate to our areas of expertise. As one printer’s CSR is fond of reminding me, “a print job well-planned is a job already half-done.” Well, maybe not half, but you get the idea.
—Source: Nani Paape is an independent project facilitator providing print production management, marketing writing and editing, and creative project planning to design firms and creative companies. Read more about Nani’s print management philosophy on her blog, Printing Disasters–and how to avoid them, at NaniPrints.wordpress.com. © 2009 Nani Paape

11 Tricks for Getting Your Envelopes Opened

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By Dean Rieck, direct mail copywriter

You should not expect an envelope to position your product. You should not use it to show off your design skills. Its job is not to entertain or amuse. You are not required to cover it with clever copy to impress a client. Aside from holding together the contents until delivered, an envelope only has one job: to get opened. 

Here are few simple ways to do that:

• Follow headline rules to write teaser copy. Generate interest with a provocative statement. Provoke curiosity with a question headline or incomplete statement. State a problem on the envelope and suggest the solution is inside. Teaser copy acts like a headline and leads people to read the letter.

• Use teaser copy to select your audience. It should be clear at a glance that your message is addressed specifically to your reader. Use key words that relate to your prospect’s interests or identity, such as “Exclusive offer for golfers inside” or “For serious investors only.”

 Refer to the contents of the envelope. Tell your reader there’s something free, valuable, new, or exclusive inside. If you’ve actually enclosed something–such as a sample, booklet, checklist, discount coupon, how-to guide, or newsletter–say so. 

 Use directive language. If you want something, you have to ask for it. So prompt your reader to open the envelope with copy such as “inside,” “see inside,” or “open immediately.” Combine this with a benefit to jump start your sales message. “FREE Recipes! Look inside…” or “How to pay $0 in taxes! See inside for details….” 

• Fully develop your “envelope real estate” to sell the sizzle. If you have a flashy, desirable product, you can crank up the excitement by using every square inch of your envelope, front and back. Show the product. Bullet point benefits. Starburst your special price. Hint at a special gift for immediate orders. This works best for consumer offers that are proven sellers needing little explanation, such as books, software upgrades, fact-packed newsletters, etc.

• Use illustrations or photos. If you’re spilling your guts on the envelope, you might as well go all the way and show your product, premium, gift, or whatever. Simple pictures communicate instantly. A photo of a book with the word “FREE” next to it is better than lines and lines of clever copy. 

• Consider involvement devices. Stickers, tokens, stamps, coins, scratch-offs, lift-up tabs, attached notes, seals, and other widgets can be used to good effect if you have the budget, if they can boost response enough to justify the added cost, and if they fit with the feel of your message. 

• Put your deadline on the outside. Inertia is your enemy. Action is your friend. Deadlines induce action. Therefore, if you’re sure about your mailing date, a deadline can prevent your prospect from setting aside your envelope for later. If you’re using a window envelope and personalized letter, you can print the date on the letter to cut envelope costs for future mailings. (I prefer real deadlines over arbitrary ones. It’s more honest and will preserve your believability if you’re mailing often to the same lists.)

• If you’re mailing to a business, use a low-key approach. Most business-to-business mail is intercepted by a secretary, assistant, or mail room. If it lo
oks too much like advertising, it may get trashed. You stand a better chance of reaching your prospect if your envelope looks personal, important, and businesslike. Less is also more for offers that may meet some resistance at first glance and need more selling, which is best done in a letter. 

By Dean Rieck, direct mail copywriter


You should not expect an envelope to position your product. You should not use it to show off your design skills. Its job is not to entertain or amuse. You are not required to cover it with clever copy to impress a client. Aside from holding together the contents until delivered, an envelope only has one job: to get opened. 


Here are few simple ways to do that:

• Follow headline rules to write teaser copy. Generate interest with a provocative statement. Provoke curiosity with a question headline or incomplete statement. State a problem on the envelope and suggest the solution is inside. Teaser copy acts like a headline and leads people to read the letter.


• Use teaser copy to select your audience. It should be clear at a glance that your message is addressed specifically to your reader. Use key words that relate to your prospect’s interests or identity, such as “Exclusive offer for golfers inside” or “For serious investors only.”


• Refer to the contents of the envelope. Tell your reader there’s something free, valuable, new, or exclusive inside. If you’ve actually enclosed something–such as a sample, booklet, checklist, discount coupon, how-to guide, or newsletter–say so. 


• Use directive language. If you want something, you have to ask for it. So prompt your reader to open the envelope with copy such as “inside,” “see inside,” or “open immediately.” Combine this with a benefit to jump start your sales message. “FREE Recipes! Look inside…” or “How to pay $0 in taxes! See inside for details….” 


• Fully develop your “envelope real estate” to sell the sizzle. If you have a flashy, desirable product, you can crank up the excitement by using every square inch of your envelope, front and back. Show the product. Bullet point benefits. Starburst your special price. Hint at a special gift for immediate orders. This works best for consumer offers that are proven sellers needing little explanation, such as books, software upgrades, fact-packed newsletters, etc.


• Use illustrations or photos. If you’re spilling your guts on the envelope, you might as well go all the way and show your product, premium, gift, or whatever. Simple pictures communicate instantly. A photo of a book with the word “FREE” next to it is better than lines and lines of clever copy. 


• Consider involvement devices. Stickers, tokens, stamps, coins, scratch-offs, lift-up tabs, attached notes, seals, and other widgets can be used to good effect if you have the budget, if they can boost response enough to justify the added cost, and if they fit with the feel of your message. 


• Put your deadline on the outside. Inertia is your enemy. Action is your friend. Deadlines induce action. Therefore, if you’re sure about your mailing date, a deadline can prevent your prospect from setting aside your envelope for later. If you’re using a window envelope and personalized letter, you can print the date on the letter to cut envelope costs for future mailings. (I prefer real deadlines over arbitrary ones. It’s more honest and will preserve your believability if you’re mailing often to the same lists.)


• If you’re mailing to a business, use a low-key approach. Most business-to-business mail is intercepted by a secretary, assistant, or mail room. If it looks too much like advertising, it may get trashed. You stand a better chance of reaching your prospect if your envelope looks personal, important, and businesslike. Less is also more for offers that may meet some resistance at first glance and need more selling, which is best done in a letter. 


• If you use a blank envelope, make it completely blank. Not a single word of teaser copy. No graphics. Perhaps not even your logo. Just a street address in upper left corner and your delivery address. You might include the letter signer’s name in the corner card, particularly if that person is well-known. This makes your mailing look personal and is almost certain to get opened.


• Be careful with “official” envelopes. Faux express envelopes, government notices, invoices, and other formats can be used to great effect. However, be clear about your intentions. If it’s just part of the theme of your message, and people are clear about who you are and what you want, that’s fine. If you’re trying to trick people or pose as something you’re not, that’s unethical. If you have to deceive people to get response, there’s something wrong with your product or service. 

—Source: Dean Rieck is a leading direct mail copywriter . For more copywriting and selling tips, sign up for Dean’s FREE direct response newsletter or visit Pro Copy Tips.

• If you use a blank envelope, make it completely blank.Not a single word of teaser copy. No graphics. Perhaps not even your logo. Just a street address in upper left corner and your delivery address. You might include the letter signer’s name in the corner card, particularly if that person is well-known. This makes your mailing look personal and is almost certain to get opened.

• Be careful with “official” envelopes. Faux express envelopes, government notices, invoices, and other formats can be used to great effect. However, be clear about your intentions. If it’s just part of the theme of your message, and people are clear about who you are and what you want, that’s fine. If you’re trying to trick people or pose as something you’re not, that’s unethical. If you have to deceive people to get response, there’s something wrong with your product or service. 

—Source: Dean Rieck is a leading direct mail copywriter . For more copywriting and selling ti
ps, sign up for Dean’s FREEdirect response newsletter or visit Pro Copy Tips.